Gacha, the drug lord, at the time of his apprehension and death, was carrying a 38-caliber revolver, a nine-millimeter pistol, a submachine gun, and a rifle. A rifle grenade, five war grenades and five rifle loaders were seized from his truck.

Gacha, the drug lord, at the time of his apprehension and death, was carrying a 38-caliber revolver, a nine-millimeter pistol, a submachine gun, and a rifle. A rifle grenade, five war grenades and five rifle loaders were seized from his truck.

It is the true life story of Gonzalo Rodríguez Gacha ("El Mexicano"), the drug lord of the Bogota branch of the Colombian Drug Cartel. This historical novel offers a factual and knowledgeable Colombian perspective that well connected Colombians have known for years: the real Drug Cartel, a group consisting of over two-hundred drug traffickers, met for the first time in 1976, not to discuss drugs, but to devise a solution to the kidnapping and murders inflicted upon them by the Marxist guerrillas. It is the gripping story of "El Mexicano,"  when at age six, he witnesses the massacre of his family by the Colombian Army. It shows his involvement with the adolescent city gang, El Centro, which controlled Colombia's lucrative emerald black market, to the Cartel's development from a national to international status.                                                                                            

In an operation by the Colombian police’s Cuerpo Élite, the drug trafficker Gonzalo Rodríguez Gacha, one of the leaders of the Medellín Cartel, was taken down.   Author Peter A. Neissa has written a gripping story.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

At 1:45 pm on December 15, 1989, units of this specialized group tracked down Gonzalo Rodríguez Gacha in a farm on the border between the departments of Córdoba and Sucre. More than 50 agents participated in the operation, which took down alias “El Mexicano” (The Mexican), his son Fredy Rodríguez Celades, and 15 of his lieutenants.

On the Trail of “El Mexicano”

Gacha, who was one of the people on the extradition list to the USA, had been tracked down the day before his death in the Bocagrande sector of Cartagena. From there, he fled toward Coveñas. When he tried to get to this town, a patrol car of the Colombian Naval Infantry spotted him and informed the police.

The criminals escaped on the highway to Tolú and after a confrontation with the police officers, they hid inside La Lucha farm. Their plan was to escape into the forest, but they were caught by an armed helicopter.

Criminal Record

Alias “El Mexicano” was the second most wanted man in Colombia after Pablo Escobar. The police offered a reward of COP 100 million for anyone who gave information on his whereabouts. He was one of the people in charge of ordering the terrorist attacks as part of the war the Medellín Cartel waged on the Colombian state to avoid extradition.

“El Mexicano’ was one of the most feared men in Colombia and the authorities had accused him of the largest homicides that had been perpetrated in the country in recent years.” El Espectador, December 16, 1989.

Additionally, he was considered the main person responsible for the distribution of cocaine from Panama to California. He was accused of having participated in the assassination of Minister of Justice Rodrigo Lara Bonilla, Judge Tulio Manuel Castro Gil, Colonel Jaime Ramírez Gómez and the presidential candidate Luis Carlos Galán. Furthermore, he had coordinated a series of bomb attacks, which included the bombing of the El Espectador and Vanguardia Liberal newspapers.

He was connected to a series of massacres in the Middle Magdalena Region, in Urabá and in Córdoba. These included the massacres of Punta Coquitos in Antioquia; Mejor Esquina in Córdoba; La Negra in Antioquia; Piñalito in Meta; Segovia in Antioquia; Saiza and El Toma in Córdoba; San Rafael in Antioquia; Otanche in Boyacá; and Finca Honduras in Antioquia.

He started his criminal activities in 1970 smuggling emeralds. In 1976, he joined the drug trafficking business, and he spent the last years of his life financing paramilitary groups. One of the last terrorist attacks attributed to him was the bus bomb that destroyed the Administrative Department of Security (DAS, for the Spanish original) building on December 6, 1989.

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