Latino rebels engage on disruption and direct action in the 23rd Century. Their protest and rebellion against the powerful face their own set of struggles in a dystopic Cali-Texas.

Latino rebels engage on disruption and direct action in the 23rd Century. Their protest and rebellion against the powerful face their own set of struggles in a dystopic Cali-Texas.

Speculative fiction and science fiction are both genres that defamiliarize and create alternate imaginaries. Often they posit current problems in imaginary futuristic spaces, allowing for critical distancing regarding what can be either utopic or dystopic settings. Keep Me Posted. Logins from Tomorrow engages in that practice. Keep Me Posted is, in a fashion, a sequel to our first novel, LunarBraceros 2125 - 2148, whose future present sees the secession of the western United States in the late 21st century that created the nation-state of Cali-Texas, including northern Mexico. By 2100 Cali-Texas has established Reservations forcing unemployed or indebted residents to relocate there. Only those able to secure employment or have someone pay off their debts and house them can leave. Once these Reservations, it is hard to get out; they are, for all intents and purposes, family prison camps. Students like Lydia and RichardVallejo from the Fresno Reserve get out of the reservation when they are selected to be tech-heads and continue studying in Los Angeles.In time those involved in movements protesting the Reservation system, like Lydia and her boyfriend, are arrested and sent to prison. Once there, they have two options: sign up to work for a multi-national corporation or else sign up for a tech detail being sent to the Moon to dispose of toxic waste. Lydia accepts to be sent to the Moon as lunar Bracero to get out of prison. Her work as a tech results in earning stipends back on Earth that she can use to get her sister and parents out of the Reservation. Events on the Moon will call for struggle, solidarity and ultimately escape for Lydia, Frank, and the rest of the Lunar Braceros.

 The characters deal with state oppression in alliance with capitalist corporations, the powerful and the powerless, science research, migration, labor exploitation, the commons, dispossession, and rebellion.

Our second novel Keep Me Posted: Logins from Tomorrow projects us into the 23rd century, where now the great-grandchildren of LydiaVallejo and Frank Ho, inheriting the Vallejo-Ho tech skills as well as the gene for protest and rebellion, face their own set of struggles in a dystopic Cali-Texas. The novel looks back on the 22nd-century rebellion that brought reforms but not systemic change; the powerful still call the shots. What the Vallejo-Ho descendants, now residing inSan TJ, really want is to do science. Nevertheless, their social reality compels them to action, and they become part of a new rebellion in Cali-Texas, even while each tries to continue researching astronomy, ecology, and space travel to Mars. It’s a world where high tech is developed and deployed not only by the state against the rebels but also by the insurrectionists themselves, including the Vallejograndchildren. The enemies of the past are still there, and the younger generation of Vallejos are propelled into this future and their own version of continuing social struggle, now seeing themselves as“los nuevos magonistas.”


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